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Christian Louboutin Being a runner over 40 has presented new areas of interest (and concern) for me on the road and more importantly in my training and recovery off the road. I love to run and it's great to see research being done on older runners...the Stanford study that shows that running slows aging or the Yale study that shows that older marathon runners (women in particular) are improving their running times more than younger runners. I would like to share some insights and tips that I have learned along the way. Many of these women's running tips can apply to all runners, but they definitely take on a new perspective as the years go on and we get older, wiser, and perhaps, faster... Training Tips: 1. Adding Miles: SLOWLY! Use the 10% rule. Add no more than 10% increase of the mileage each week. Here's more detailed explanation and chart from FitSugar. 2. Warmup: As we get older, the body needs time to get going and giving it that time will help avoid injuries. See "The Perfect Warmup" from Runner's World. 3.Cross-Training: Is a must for any runner, but as you age the relationship between cross-training and running becomes even more important.

Christian Louboutin shoes For a different, low impact, cross-training option, see our recent post on Aqua Running (or Pool Running). Core exercises have become another essential, here's some good ones from Runners World. 4.Strength Training: There is a lot of information out there on lifting weights and strength training, but being careful to start this in the "right" way is important as we get older. Running Planet has done a nice job w/ laying out "The 8 rules of Strength Training". We have some good videos on our Resources page. 5.Stretching/Yoga: Another must for the aging runner (and this has certainly been debated by many). Dara Torres proved this in her Olympic effort that stunned us all. She adhered to a strict resistance stretching regime (see previous post - Doing the Home Stretch with Dara Torres). I am not a huge fan of yoga, but here's a good article by Runners World about a runner w/ a ITB injury who didn't like yoga at the beginning, then became a convert. My always injury free LDF ("Long Distance Friend") swears by power yoga! 6.Rest: This has become one of the most important parts of my training.

Christian Louboutin sale If I don't get enough rest, my body begins to break down. Listen (very closely) to your body. 7.Massage: Another Dara Torres staple and one of my personal favorites. It does not matter if you have a fabulous husband like I do or get from a pro, it works to relieve the stress of training and tired muscles. You can even do it yourself w/ some videos by Rich Poley who wrote "Self Massage for Athletes". 8.Set a Goal: Having a goal or a race to strive for makes the training have a purpose and keep me focused. 9.Training Programs: A little planning goes a long way. If possible, try to plan your training to run more often on softer surfaces like trails, dirt roads, grassy parks, or even the track. A few good programs are on our resource page. There are many good ones out there--find one that suits you. 10.The Track: Most marathon training programs will include track work as it helps develop the fast twitch muscles to build speed and lung power during a race...getting older does not mean getting less competitive:) If I am training for a marathon, it really makes a difference for me especially in the later miles of the race.